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September 26th, 2014 by

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The diagram is an infographic with the title: States as Model Employers of People with Disabilities.  States as employers can have a major impact on the employment rate of people with disabilities. Heading: States are LARGE employers:  Underneath this text heading are 4 rectangles. Along the left side of the 4 rectangles is the text: People Employed.  The first rectangle has a female figure in yellow inside a large red rectangle. It shows that 19 million people are employed by State & Local Government.  The next rectangle is a little smaller and has a dark blue figure of a male inside a light blue rectangle. It shows that 17 million people are employed in Healthcare and Social Assistance.  The third rectangle is a little smaller than the second rectangle. It has a dark blue female figure inside a light blue rectangle. It shows that 12 million people work in Manufacturing. The last rectangle is the smallest. It has a dark blue male figure inside a light blue rectangle. It shows that 5.5 million people work in Construction.  The next diagram is illustrated in a triangle divided into three sections.  The heading over this triangle is: Building Blocks of States as Model Employers. The top third of the triangle in yellow is labeled POLICY and LEADERSHIP. Outside of this triangle, it states: Evaluation and Adjustment Programs, Measuring Goals for Accountability, and Forming Partnerships with VR and Hiring Agencies. The lower left third of the triangle in orange is labeled HR PRACTICES. Outside this section, it states: Early Intervention and Return to Work; Fast Track Hiring; and Internships and Job Shadowing. The lower right third of the triangle in red is labeled EDUCATION and AWARENESS. Outside this section, it states Disability Diversity Training, and Website Accessibility.  Source:  Krepcio, K., Barnett, S. (2013). States as model employers of people with disabilities: A comprehensive review of politics, practices and strategies. Employer Assistance and Resource Network. http://www.askearn.org/docs/statemodel.pdf.   The bottom of this infographic shows the web link: www.askearn.org/sameA new blog article on the EARN|Exchange highlights recent findings from a report from the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers. States as Model Employers of People with Disabilities: A Comprehensive Review of Policies, Practices, and Strategies describes the role states and local governments can play in advancing the employment of individuals with disabilities. EARN’s latest infographic illustrates that the public sector is one of the largest employers in the nation and depicts the building blocks of states as model employers.

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For more information and employer resources, visit www.AskEARN.org.

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September 26th, 2014 by
The diagram is an infographic with the title: States as Model Employers of People with Disabilities.  States as employers can have a major impact on the employment rate of people with disabilities. Heading: States are LARGE employers:  Underneath this text heading are 4 rectangles. Along the left side of the 4 rectangles is the text: People Employed.  The first rectangle has a female figure in yellow inside a large red rectangle. It shows that 19 million people are employed by State & Local Government.  The next rectangle is a little smaller and has a dark blue figure of a male inside a light blue rectangle. It shows that 17 million people are employed in Healthcare and Social Assistance.  The third rectangle is a little smaller than the second rectangle; it has a dark blue female figure inside a light blue rectangle. It shows that 12 million people work in Manufacturing. The last rectangle is the smallest. It has a dark blue male figure inside a light blue rectangle. It shows that 5.5 million people work in Construction.  The next diagram is illustrated in a triangle divided into three sections.  The heading over this triangle is: Building Blocks of States as Model Employers. The top third of the triangle in yellow is labeled POLICY and LEADERSHIP. Outside of this triangle, it states: Evaluation and Adjustment Programs, Measuring Goals for Accountability, and Forming Partnerships with VR and Hiring Agencies. The lower left third of the triangle in orange is labeled HR PRACTICES. Outside this section, it states: Early Intervention and Return to Work; Fast Track Hiring; and Internships and Job Shadowing. The lower right third of the triangle in red is labeled EDUCATION and AWARENESS. Outside this section, it states Disability Diversity Training, and Website Accessibility.  Source:  Krepcio, K., Barnett, S. (2013). States as model employers of people with disabilities: A comprehensive review of politics, practices and strategies. Employer Assistance and Resource Network. http://www.askearn.org/docs/statemodel.pdf.   The bottom of this infographic shows the web link: www.askearn.org/same

States as Model Employers Infographic

By Kathy Krepcio
Executive Director, Disability Employment, Research Design, Workforce Policy at the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development

Earlier this month, the nation celebrated Labor Day, a national holiday designed to pay tribute to the contributions and achievement of American workers. As many of us know, work is an important part of our lives. It’s not only a source of income and economic support, it also provides daily structure and focus; makes life meaningful; offers an outlet for acquiring, developing, and mastering skills and knowledge; and for building social relationships.
Americans work in all kinds of job settings, sometimes for themselves, and for all types of employers—large, small, private companies, and public agencies. While a very large portion work in the private sector, more than 19 million Americans work in some type of full- and part-time public-sector job, and more than Continue reading →

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September 19th, 2014 by

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PARTNERING WITH COMMUNITY COLLEGES: INITIATIVES, INCLUSION, INVOLVEMENT

Image of the Community College reportIn a competitive, global economy that increas¬ingly requires job seekers to acquire at least some postsecondary education, the nation’s 1,132 community colleges are regarded as the “backbone” of the public work¬force system, according to a new report from the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers.

President Obama set a goal for the United States to have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world by 2020 and identified community colleges as key players in achieving this goal. Focusing on a review of federal, national, and local efforts that nurture community college partnerships with employers, the report reveals that recent research and policy analysis has resulted in an increased understanding of the dynamics of community colleges, their students, and their role in local labor markets. The report also highlights the impor¬tance of ensuring that community college training and education reflects the needs of employers and enables students and job seekers to connect with and keep jobs. Additionally, the report recommends the need to increase the inclusion and involvement of people with disabilities in community college-employer partnerships and provides a federally funded resource for doing so. By partnering more closely with employers, com¬munity colleges can help prepare workers, including individuals with disabilities, with education and training that is directly relevant to employment opportunities.

Read the report here.


NUMBER POWER

Logo for the US DOLStatistics provide power, according to Dr. Cherise Hunter, social science research analyst with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). In the most recent installation of the DOL’s blog (Work in Progress), Dr. Hunter speaks to the importance of data in understanding disability prevalence, trends around disability issues, disability policy and planning needs, and the wide range of data sources used to create policy initiatives that ultimately lead to ODEP’s goal of advancing employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

Read the blog post.

REPORT HIGHLIGHTS IMPORTANCE OF WORKPLACE WELLNESS PROGRAMS ADDRESSING SUBSTANCE ABUSE DISORDERS

Logo for SAMHSATwo SAMHSA reports show that while many employers have policies and programs addressing substance-use disorders, many of the 10.8 million full-time workers with these issues may not be receiving help in the workplace. To reduce risky or unhealthy practices, SAMHSA promotes screening, brief interventions, and referral to treatment. SAMHSA maintains that early identification with subsequent intervention can promote health and save lives.

View the reports.

EVOLVING VIEWS ON DISABILITY DISCLOSURE IN THE WORKPLACE

Logo for Cornell UniversityWith the recent changes to Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act, many employers may be confused about whether they can ask an employee about a disability, fearing that such questions may conflict with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which prohibits these inquiries. Cornell University’s Senior Extension Associate, Hannah Rudstam, clarified that “Under the ADA, employers have always been allowed to ask applicants and employees to voluntarily self-identify as a persons with a disability as long as certain guidelines are followed.” Rudstam and Erin M. Sember-Chase, technical assistance coordinator for EARN and the Northeast ADA Center at Cornell University, elaborate on the importance of employers building a “climate of trust” and how attitudes toward disability disclosure are shifting as businesses diversify their workforce and create more inclusive environments.

Read more here.

BOOTS TO BUSINESS: HELPING VETERANS BECOME AMERICA’S FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS

“Boots to Business: From Service to Startup” is a new program established by the Small Business Administration “to help veterans become America’s future entrepreneurs and business leaders.” The free training program provides transitioning service members with an opportunity to learn the basics of entrepreneurship and strategies for owning a small business. All transitioning members, regardless of rank or transition stage, and their spouses and dependents can participate in the program.

Read more here.

BARCLAYS LAUNCHES RETURN ON DISABILITY ETNs

Logo for BarclaysOn September 10, 2014, Barclays Bank PLC announced the launch of the Barclays Return on Disability Exchange Traded Notes, also known as ETNs. The ETNs are linked to the performance of the Return on Disability (US LargeCap ETN Total Return USD Index), and are designed to provide investors with exposure to US-based companies that have acted to attract and serve people with disabilities as customers and employees. “Approximately 57 million people in the US have a disability–that’s 19% of the population. Companies that invest in targeting and empowering this group offer advantages over the companies that don’t,” said Sue Meirs, Director in Equities and Funds Structured Markets, and Americas co-chair of Barclays’s disability employee network, REACH. ETNs allow investors to invest in socially-responsible themes that can help catalyze change across many companies.

Read more here.

Disability Employment Statistics


COUNTDOWN TO NDEAM

Image of NDEAM 2014 poster.Held each October, National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) is an annual campaign led by the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to raise awareness about employing people with disabilities and to celebrate their many and varied contributions to America’s workforce. The campaign’s theme this year was developed with suggestions from the public through an online dialogue. “I’m so pleased with the result,” writes Assistant Secretary Kathleen Martinez in her blog (Work in Progress), “because those three words–expect, employ, empower–clearly convey that advancing disability employment is about more than any singular thing. Rather, it’s about creating a cycle of inclusion.”

Click here for NDEAM resources and tools, including NDEAM posters in English and Spanish.

TOOLS TO EDUCATE BUSINESS IN 30 SECONDS

As part of ongoing technical assistance, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Technical Assistance Team, National Disability Institute (NDI), created the Employment and Disability 30-Second Training Series and complementary Business Resource Guide. These resources are designed to educate employers, hiring managers, and supervisors about proven strategies and easy-to-use resources to hire, retain, and advance e existing employees who experience the onset of a disability or who have existing disabilities. These tools will provide valuable information to businesses.

Click here to access the tools.

WEBINAR, “DO ASK, DO TELL” FOCUSES ON SELF-ID

EARN and The Conference Board will host a free webinar on Monday, September 22 from 12:00-1:00 p.m. EDT on fostering self-identification. Employers will learn how to build an inclusive workplace where employees feel safe disclosing that they have a disability while also meeting the new federal requirements for government contractors. Results of a survey conducted by The Conference Board on behalf of EARN will be shared regarding practices and experiences related to encouraging disclosure. Registration is free. HRCI credits will be available to participants. A code will be provided for HRCI credit at the conclusion of the webinar.

Register here.

DEADLINE EXTENDED FOR 4th ANNUAL MY AMERICAN DREAM VIDEO CONTEST

Logo for NDI.National Disability Institute (NDI) recently announced it has extended the entry deadline for its 4th Annual My American Dream: Voices of Americans with Disabilities Video Contest to September 23, 2014. The contest encourages people with disabilities to share their American dreams for a chance to win $1,000, a digital tablet, and sessions with a mentor to help make those dreams a reality.

Read more here.

FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES: THE NEW NORM?

Logo for SHRM.Most employers probably assume that the ability to work a regular, predictable schedule is an essential function of one’s job. But when it comes to evaluating requests for reasonable accommodations, employers can no longer assume this to be true without a detailed analysis of the key facts at hand. Company policies, truly essential job duties, and the consistent treatment of other, similarly situated employees must be considered when evaluating requests for reasonable accommodation.

Read more here.

THE INTERACTIVE PROCESS UNDER THE ADA: ARE YOU ENGAGING IN IT?

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), an employer has the obligation to engage in an interactive process with employees with disabilities to create and sustain reasonable accommodations. Two recent court cases have highlighted the critical importance of thorough communication and documentation evidencing employers’ efforts at engagement and compliance.

Read more here.

CHALLENGES CONFRONT PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES WHO PURSUE STEM CAREERS

A recent online dialogue hosted by a federal office and advocacy group revealed that stereotypes, lack of mentors, and ignorance about the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are still among the challenges that people with disabilities face on the job. Employers need education to counter the biases they may have about people with disabilities. The dialogue provided some solutions to help ameliorate those challenges.

Read more here.

EARN is funded by the
U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy

 

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September 19th, 2014 by

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In a competitive, global economy that increas­ingly requires job seekers to acquire at least some postsecondary education, the nation’s 1,132 community colleges are regarded as the “backbone” of the public work­force system, according to a new report from the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers. Among other findings, the report reveals that by partnering more closely with employers, com­munity colleges can help prepare workers, including individuals with disabilities, with education and training that is directly relevant to employment opportunities.

Read “A Review of Community College-Employer Partnerships and Initiatives: Expanding Opportunities for Job Seekers with Disabilities.”

For more information and employer resources, visit www.AskEARN.org.

 

No comments yet